In Grandma’s Kitchen (Part I)

One of my fondest childhood memories is being in the kitchen with my Hungarian grandmother. I loved watching her chopping vegetables, kneading dough, and leaning over bubbling pots in a kitchen that was always filled with wonderful aromas. I’d always help her after school–shelling peas or beans, scrubbing and peeling vegetables, and when I got older, helping to prepare dinner. My favorite was Friday dinner–we would always have some kind of savory soup followed by a noodle or sweet dish. I was always a sweet tooth and looked forward to egg noodles with eggs or jam, palacsinta (Hungarian crepes eaten with jam, cocoa, nuts or sweet cheese fillings), and, in the late summer, silvas gomboc (plum dumplings) topped with cinnamon sugar breadcrumbs.

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Hot and Spicy Appetizers Add Fiery Heat to Liven Up Any Party Or Get Together

There is no better way to perk up a party-going crowd than to offer a spicy, interesting appetizer, or serve up a fiery first course to a great meal. Appetizers can provide an exiting range of flavors, and many recipes can be prepared with very little effort. Fortunately, even those spicy appetizers that require a little more of your time, such as the Greek Chile-Cheese Pastries recipe below, taste so good that you may find yourself making them many times.

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My Yugoslav or Serbian Heritage Food Memories, KIFLI

I grew up with the knowledge that my Dad’s parents came to the U.S. from Yugoslavia in the very early 1900s. I understand now that Yugoslavia was a union of countries at the time, but the area where my grandparents came from was Kucur, Backa, in the province of Vojvodina, in what is Serbia, today. My Yugoslav, or Serbian, grandparents lived on a farm in rural Ohio. They had chickens, so eggs were plentiful. They grew crops. They lived far differently than my Mom’s town folk during the Depression and World Wars. My Mom recalled that early in her engagement with my Dad, she went over to his parents’ house after church one Sunday, for breakfast. She was appalled that Grandma had more than 13 eggs in a bowl, to make scrambled eggs. She felt it was nearly obscene to have that many eggs for a family of five. That brought home to me the huge differences between town and country in those times.

» Read more: My Yugoslav or Serbian Heritage Food Memories, KIFLI